Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Evening -



Today was my time with Zach.   One of his little classmates today asked me to bend down so she could talk to me.  She asked if I would take her home with me.  My heart lit.

Zach wanted to go to Blackie's Pasture today and that works for me.  He was Popeye and I, Olive Oyl.  We discussed muscles and spinach.   We did a great deal of running, and we went inside the trees along the water there, and he climbed up on the branches that rise from the ground.  We walked to the gazebo dedicated to little Lori who died very young.  The inside has stars on the lavender ceiling.  Zach pointed out there were stars on the outside, too.  They were clumps of lichen, a sign there is no pollution there by the bay.  We played with two grebes who were in the water and would dive under and then pop up, following along our path.    We saw the sky turn pink, then, dark, and the lovely crescent moon bright in the sky.

I am reading Jack Kornfield's latest book, The Wise Heart, A Guide to the Universal Teachings of Buddhist Psychology.  I highly recommend it. 


I love the thought of 117,000 books traveling on camels, the first bookmobile. 


Jack Kornfield:

"Buddhist psychology was originally an oral tradition, recited for five hundred years before ever being written down. Numbered lists are a traditional mnemonic device, a way to remember the teachings in detail and depth without losing critical information. They were part of the science of the times, ordered and repeated, used in inner experiments of exquisite accuracy for centuries.  Even though they now exist as written texts, these lists are still recited from memory and regarded as a precious legacy.  Indeed, this form of systemized knowledge was respected not just in India, but throughout the educated cultures of the ancient world. It is recorded that Abdul Kassem Ismael, grand vizier of Persia in the tenth century, couldn't bear to part with his 117,000 volume library.  When he traveled, those books were carried by a caravan of four hundred camels, trained to walk in a way that preserved the library's alphabetical order."



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