Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Balance -

This morning I was trying to clean my oatmeal pan from yesterday that I left on the stove too long, so there was a dark scrunge, and I was hoping by letting it sit there and happily soak, it would magically clean itself, but no it really was necessary for me to add a little attention and pressure, so the pan and I shared quite a philosophical moment today. It let go of something it had become attached to and I realized that smoothing my edges may require an extra grade of sandpaper. I want to be clear - I almost said transparent, but if I hear one more politician use that word, I am going to vomit. It reminds me of the word "situation" as it was used in sports a few years ago. Now, I don't watch sports so I don't know the latest buzzword. The point is that I want to be clean and shiny like my pan, with nothing extra attached, and then, I start to say, like barnacles, to my soul, and I realize I like barnacles, and maybe I wouldn't mind being in a symbiotic relationship with some, so there is that.

I check and it appears that whales don't gain anything from the barnacles that hitch a free ride. I suppose it is like us in an airplane, though we are not completely harmless as we add a great deal of noise, commotion and weight.

http://www.learner.org/jnorth/tm/gwhale/Hitchhikers.html

In the New Yorker, there is an article on the slums surrounding the airport in Mumbai. It is titled Opening Night, The Scene from the Airport Slums and is by Katherine Boo. (I love that last name.) She is contrasting the slums and the "beautiful" people preparing for the opening of the film "Slumdog Millionaire." Those attending come to the hotels surrounding the airport to be "manicured, exfoliated and blown out."


I find this paragraph particularly sobering as to how we are all now tied.

"The banks in America went in a loss, then the big people went in a loss, then the scrap market in the slum areas came down, too," was how Anna, who read the Tamil-language newspapers, had explained the crisis to the residents. A kilo of empty water bottles, once worth twenty-five rupees, was now worth ten. This was how the crisis was understood."
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