Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

In morning light -



I woke with a different opinion of the Julie Powell character played by Amy Adams in Julia and Julie.

I realized it shows the two different time periods.  Julie was able to build a following by posting daily.  She also showed her daily and even moment by moment moods.  Julia's life has the benefit of time, reflection and editing.  We are shown a more complex character and the movie begins with her having already achieved success during the war, so, in a way, she had less to prove, though she still wanted to be busy and involved.  She found her calling in cooking and persevered.  Julie uses her as a model to build her own life, to give herself a goal, and a way to actually stick to something, for, as her mother says, the first time in her life.  They are two different people in two different time periods.  Julia Child and her sister were very tall, and they both admit that because they clearly didn't fit it, there was a freedom from the beginning to do as they pleased.

I love the book on Julia Child from which the movie was taken.  She had a rich life in a different time period.  Who knows what we would think of her if she had a daily blog.   Who knows how the cookbook would have developed, but it is unlikely it would have had its strength without the years of revision.  We lose something and gain something in these modern times, but that the movie is still with me this morning and I am still thinking about the "characters" says it had an affect.

Perhaps I rebelled against what appeared to be a Cinderella story for Julie and yet it actually was.  She wrote a blog, and then, a book, and now there is a movie.  Cinderella finds her own shoe at the ball and walks alongside the prince.



And now, on reflection, I'm back with what originally bothered me.  It is a Cinderella story.  In the beginning, Julie Powell is seen having lunch with three successful friends, all busy on their cell phones.  It appears she judges that, and yet, it is jealousy because by the end, she, too, is successful, as regards fame and money, though she has muddled through her actual job and not given it her  best even though she has an understanding boss.   Do we only watch what celebrates the "super-hero," the successful?  Is that the entertainment archetype we need?  What if she had actually found satisfaction in her "mediocre" job and remained unknown?  Does that a movie make?

Perhaps since my niece's visit, I'm more aware of the role models we present, the goals we set, and we Americans are taught to achieve and compete, and perhaps that is why we as a nation struggle to accept universal health care.  Can't "they" do it on their own?  They do it in the movies, but life is more complex than that as is a true definition of success and I do see they tried in the movie to show that it really is all about Julie following her dream, and yet, in reality, her dream did come true. Is that possible for us all? Perhaps when success is internally set.  


 


Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

  • 0 comments