Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Good Morning!



I was enjoying my morning coffee this morning when I looked out and saw what I thought were two birds hovering on the ridge.  Then, I realized they were two spots of dirt on the window, and then, the light changed and I didn't see them at all.   I wonder how often we mis-interpret and when it might be an entertaining thing to do, like looking on the bright side and hearing freeway noise as the sound of the sea, and when it is running away.  I could interpret the spots as that it is time to clean the window or I can wait for the light to change, or I can enjoy imagining myself as a hawk thermaling on the air on the hill. 

I am trying to be a little less influenced by the outside news which is such a downer right now and live a little more inwardly, to make more contact with what brews within.  My dreams continue to fascinate and I am sleeping deeply. 

I am enthralled with the book, In Praise of Slowness by Carl Honore.  I smile when I read this part.  I never thought of protests against the sundial.  How funny we are, we human beings. 

Honore:

Today's pro-Slow organizations belong to a tradition of resistance that started long before the industrial era. Even in the ancient world, our ancestors chafed against the tyranny of timekeeping. In 200 B.C., the Roman playwright Plautus penned the following lament:

The Gods confound the man who first found out
How to distinguish the hours - confound him, too
Who in this place set up a sundial
To cut and hack my days so wretchedly
Into small pieces!

.... I can't (even sit down to eat) unless the sun gives leave.  The town's so full of these confounded dials ...


Now, that you're smiling, I'll continue with this:

In 1304, Daffyd ap Gwvilyn, a Welsh bard, fumed: "Confusion to the black-faced clock by the side of the bank that woke me!  May its head, its tongue, its pair of ropes, and its wheels moulder; likewise its weights and dullard balls, its orifices, its hammer, its ducks quacking as if anticipating day and its ever restless works."


Enjoy this weekend, three days away from clamor, bars and timepieces dividing the movement of the earth, and separating our relationship with the sun.


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