Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Language -

This is the conclusion of an article by Alex Dimitrov called The Word Wide Web.  It is in the Jan-Feb Poets and Writers magazine.  The theme this month is Inspiration.

Alex Dimitrov:

While it seems there is no lack of linguistic imagination among English speakers, according to the publishers of the Oxford dictionaries, 90 percent of everything written today is communicated using only seven thousand words.  That's a little over 4 percent of the 171,476 English words that have full entries in the second edition of the OED - and that figure doesn't include 45, 176 obsolete words, also included in the new edition. In an effort to breathe new life into outmoded words, Oxford Fajar, a subsidiary of Oxford University Press, launched its own linguistic stimulation project: the Save the Words campaign, which allows anyone to "adopt" one or more words that have fallen out of popular usage. On the project's Web site (savethewords.org) users can subscribe to a word-a-day e-mail list, get tips on how to incorporate words like nidifice (nest) into their next work meeting, and create custom T-shirts with their adopted word.  

I note that nidifice shows up as misspelled on my spell-check.  Hmmm!  

Dimitrov concludes the article with this comment: "To use one of the examples from Save the Words, contributors to such endeavors could be considered isangelous - meaning equal to the angels.

http://www.savethewords.org/


Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 0 comments