Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Perspective

Joan Palma wisely comments:   


Barbara Tuchman, In her introduction to A Distant Mirror, writes the following:

A greater hazard, built into the very nature of recorded history, is the overload of the negative: the disproportionate survival of the bad side - of evil, misery, contention, and harm. In history this is exactly the same as the daily newspaper. The normal does not make news. History is made by the documents that survive, and these lean heavily on crisis and calamity, crime and misbehavior, because such things are the subject matter of the documentary process - of lawsuits, treaties, moralists' denunciations, literary satire, papal Bulls. No Pope ever issued a Bull to approve of something. (...)

Disaster is rarely as pervasive as it seems from recorded accounts. The fact of being on the record makes it appear continuous and ubiquitous whereas it is more likely to have been sporadic both in time and place. Besides, persistence of the normal is usually greater than the effect of disturbance, as we know from our own times. After absorbing the news of today, one expects to face a world consisting entirely of strikes, crimes, power failures, broken water mains, stalled trains, school shutdowns, muggers, drug addicts, neo-Nazis, and rapists. The fact is that one can come home in the evening - on a lucky day - without having encountered more than one or two of these phenomena. This has led me to formulate Tuchmans' Law, as follows: "The fact of being reported multiplies the apparent extent of any deplorable development by five-to tenfold" (or and figure the reader would care to supply).
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