Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Today is the birthday of Albert Schweitzer, a good day to read his speech/lecture given when he received the Nobel Peace Prize.

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1952/schweitzer-lecture.html

Yesterday, I walked to the beach at Tennessee Valley and savored where the arch had been and how the area now feels more open. It's been feng shui'd.  The view to the north opens to the sky.  A dolphin smiled and leaped close to shore.  I walked with a friend high up above and we sat and talked and observed.  She is my sensory awareness buddy in the leadership training with Lee Klinger Lesser.  We spoke of how to continue the work for ourselves, and how to spread the word.  Our "homework" for this last week was:


January 6 – January 12    Soft belly? Tight belly?

  1. At different moments during your day, pause and notice what is happening in  your belly?  Is there softness there? Is there tightness there?  What are you experiencing?
  2. Is there room for softness in the core of you?
  3. Is there any bracing in the core of you?
  4. What arises in the simple noticing in each distinct moment?
  5. How does breathing move through? Can you notice its movement without pushing breathing around
  6. Can you notice what is happening without adjusting yourself
  7. Can you occupy freely whatever space you occupy?

Chris and Frieda are returned from London, and there is a new quality to the air.  I have more space for breath.   I like knowing they are close by.

Charlotte Selver, the founder of Sensory Awareness, would say: "I don't know whether you have ever realized that the air is a guest. It's not your possession.  It's a guest which comes and goes. And it's a guest which you need dearly."

Yes, and as with breath, so, too, with those we love.  They come and go, and as much as we may proclaim independence, we need them dearly too.

Blessings on this beautiful January day.  It is clear and cold here.  I've lost some plants in the last few days in the freezing temperatures.  Some will come back, and some are let go, and so it is.

And back to breathing, Charlotte continues: "The total person, the total organism is involved in this new air coming in, being welcomed, penetrating, doing its job, and that that what has been used going out.  And you allow it to - also the exhalation is one of the most important things to have - to have respect for the exhalation. To feel the going out of the air, allowing it to go out to the very last.  And not already coming in with the new air but letting it have its way."   And so, we welcome, explore, release.  



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