Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Nothing to Do, Nowhere to Go; just be!

This is always a halcyon week for Steve and me.  Steve closes the office, and all is quiet.  "Nothing to do, nowhere to be."  Ah, not quite the words, which are "Nowhere to go, nothing to do", the mantra of a group I am in, my sensory awareness group.  We have been working with breathing and support and now it is this, "nothing to do, and nowhere to go", and I feel and find such permission in it.  Again, this morning I sat and watched the clouds, and the birds flying by.  It is enough, and in enoughness, is expanse.  My breath is full and wide.  No wonder I'm entranced right now with clouds, birds, and sky.

David Whyte has this to say on Procrastination.  I find such permission in his words, such guidance, heroism,  rest, peace, and love.


PROCRASTINATION

is not what it seems… What looks from the outside like our delay; our lack of commitment; even our laziness may have more to do with a slow, necessary ripening through time and a central struggle with the core realities of any endeavor to which we have set our minds. To hate our procrastinating tendencies is in someway to hate our relationship with time itself, to be unequal to the phenomenology of revelation and the way it works its own quiet way in its very own gifted time, only emerging when the very qualities it represents have a firm correspondence in our necessarily struggling heart and imagination.

… Procrastination when studied closely can be a beautiful thing, a parallel with patience, a companionable friend, a revealer of the true pattern, already, we are surprised to find, caught within us; acknowledging for instance, as a writer, that before a book can be written, most of the ways it cannot be written must be tried first, in our minds; on the blank screen on the empty page or staring at the bedroom ceiling at four in the morning. Procrastination enables us to understand the true measure of our reluctance.

An endeavor achieved without delay, wrong turnings, occasional blank walls and a vein of self-doubt running through all, leading eventually to some degree of heart-break is a thing of the moment, a mere bagatelle, and often neither use nor ornament. It will be scanned for a moment and put aside. What is worthwhile carries the struggle of the maker written within it, but wrought into the shape of an earned understanding.

Procrastination helps us to apprentice our selves to our own reluctance, to understand the hidden darker side of the first enthusiastic idea, to learn what we are afraid of in the endeavor itself; to put an underbelly into the work so that it becomes a living, satisfying whole, not a surface trying to manipulate us in the moment.

Procrastination does not stop a project from coming to fruition, what stops us is giving up on an original idea because we have not got to the heart of the reason we are delaying, nor let the true form of our reluctance instruct us in the way ahead. To properly procrastinate is to be involved with larger entities than our own ideas, to refuse to settle for an early underachieving outcome and wrestle like Jacob with his angel, finding as Rilke said, 'Winning does not tempt that man, This is how he grows, by being defeated decisively, by greater and greater beings.'

© David Whyte
‘PROCRASTINATION’ From CONSOLATIONS:
The Solace, Nourishment and Underlying Meaning of Everyday Words

MANY RIVERS PRESS

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