Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Excited

I am again headed to the airport, this time to pick up a young woman, who is here from Germany.  She is the daughter of friends, and I haven't seen her since she was a child.  I am excited, even as I balance my jumping up and down with these words from one of my favorite  authors:

"The two most powerful warriors are patience and time."

- Leo Tolstoy




Recently there was some conflict in my Toastmasters Club, and I thought "Good Heavens," but we've worked through it and tomorrow night the theme is "Vulnerability".  How wonderful is that!

To entice you into this article, http://www.economist.com/node/21525851?frsc=dg , I give you the conclusion:

Never mind the top, avoid the bottom

Instead of opposing redistribution because people expect to make it to the top of the economic ladder, the authors of the new paper argue that people don’t like to be at the bottom. One paradoxical consequence of this “last-place aversion” is that some poor people may be vociferously opposed to the kinds of policies that would actually raise their own income a bit but that might also push those who are poorer than them into comparable or higher positions. The authors ran a series of experiments where students were randomly allotted sums of money, separated by $1, and informed about the “income distribution” that resulted. They were then given another $2, which they could give either to the person directly above or below them in the distribution.

In keeping with the notion of “last-place aversion”, the people who were a spot away from the bottom were the most likely to give the money to the person above them: rewarding the “rich” but ensuring that someone remained poorer than themselves. Those not at risk of becoming the poorest did not seem to mind falling a notch in the distribution of income nearly as much. This idea is backed up by survey data from America collected by Pew, a polling company: those who earned just a bit more than the minimum wage were the most resistant to increasing it.

Poverty may be miserable. But being able to feel a bit better-off than someone else makes it a bit more bearable.
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 0 comments