April 3rd, 2012

Alan - sunrise - Palm Springs area

"behind the beautiful forevers"

I recommend the book, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity by Katherine Boo. 

If you are feeling sorry for yourself in any way, reading this book will snap you right out of it.  Katherine looks at a slum in Mumbai, allows you to feel you are there with all the smells, rats, and attempts to get out and get ahead.  The airport is there, along with luxury hotels.  This is an opportunity to see how we live through the eyes of others.

You will treat your garbage differently, family, police, friends.  We are so blessed living here, and we know it, and this book makes it even more clear.  It reads like fiction, but it is true, hard as that may be to believe.  I had to keep reminding myself these people are real.  People live like this, and they keep striving, and all levels are striving.  Yes, there is corruption, and for each, there is rationalization too.  This book wraps compassion around what we view from outside, and it brings us inside too.



great blue heron flying

Communication

The following comes from Writer's Almanac.  You can have the news delivered daily to your email box.  

http://writersalmanac.publicradio.org/


The first truly portable personal computer was released on this date in 1981. The 25-pound Osborne 1, sold by the Osborne Computer Company, with two floppy drives, a five-inch screen, was a big success, selling 10,000 units a month.

The Pony Express began mail delivery on this date in 1860. The first mail pouch contained 49 letters, five telegrams, and a variety of papers. A rider would switch to a fresh horse every 10 to 15 miles; each rider rode a leg of 75 to 100 miles. Seventy-five horses were needed to make a one-way trip between St. Joseph, Missouri, and Sacramento, California, a distance of 1,800 miles. At an average speed of 10 miles an hour, the Pony Express could cover the distance in 10 days.

The Pony Express, as it came to be known, had only been in operation for about 10 weeks when Congress authorized construction of a telegraph line to stretch between the Missouri River and the California coast. Once the telegraph connection was completed, the Pony Express became obsolete, and it folded in October 1861.



Times have changed, and it's fun to look back.