Heart Happy (cathy_edgett) wrote,
Heart Happy
cathy_edgett

Intelligence -


Bella and Tiger are entranced with their first rain.  They want to go outside, and they are not sure.   Each one waits for the other to go out first.  Then, they stand huddled next to the door, under the overhang.   They sniff the wet deck.  It's just dripping now, so it is not about moisture pouring from the sky, and yet, every cell in their body is awake for this exploration.  They could be discovering Antartica.

I see, through them, how much I sometimes miss, and yet, I, too, am awake today, alert, aware of the sounds and the massage of rain, combing through the air.

I read this editorial  from the NY Times, and hope to gain ever more awareness of the intelligence around me.  I am reminded of the words of Pythagoras.  "Everything is intelligent!!"

Editorial

Horton Sees an Image


Published: November 2, 2006

To the very short list of animals that can recognize themselves in a mirror — i.e., humans and apes and possibly dolphins — scientists have now added the Asian elephant, or at least three female Asian elephants in the Bronx Zoo. Faced with the presence of an enormous — and rugged — full-length mirror in their enclosure, the animals displayed clear signs of grasping that they themselves were the origin of the images in the glass. One elephant, named Happy, was even able to touch a mark on her own face that was visible only in the mirror. It is still not known whether male elephants are as self-aware.

Such tests appear to mark a boundary between animals that display some form of consciousness and those that don’t. But what they really do is raise questions about the value we attribute to consciousness and our inevitably human definition of it. It is always us setting the rules. How many tests set by elephants could we pass?

Can we even pass the very simple test of allowing them to survive in the wild? The clear implication of the mirror test is that animals who pass it are somehow closer to us and thus more deserving of our protection. But as the fate of chimpanzees makes plain, we are no more likely to save species with a proto-human form of consciousness than animals whose mental life bears no resemblance to our own.

We keep probing the animal world for signs of intelligence — as we define it — and we’re always surprised when we discover it. This suggests that something is fundamentally wrong with our assumptions. There is every reason to value other life-forms as much for their difference from us as for their similarity, and to act accordingly. That may be the only intelligence test worthy of the name.

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